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Rock Street, San Francisco

Steven Butera
Lab 134 Summer 2018
TA: Filipe Rudrigues
Experiment: Lab 6 – Magnetic Force
ID#: 105144157

Introduction

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In this week’s lab, we will be working with external magnetic fields created by neodymium magnets and their effect on current. When a current is traveling through a wire passes by an external magnetic field it will experience a force acting on it. Using the principle of the right-hand rule, the direction of the magnetic force can be predicted. In order to test these predictions, we will be using two different set-ups, each with multiple configurations.

In the first set-up, we will be creating rotating motor using magnets, a screw, a AAA battery and a stripped wire. When the magnets are exposed to current, the magnet and screw will begin to rotate. In the second set-up, a wire will be connected to a voltage source and placed near the magnets. This will cause the wire to move either up or down. In both set ups the direction of the magnetic force will be predicted and tested.

Procedure

Direction of Magnetic Field Set-Up

1. We will first figure out the direction of the magnetic field by using the Magnometer function in the iO lab software. Once turned on, only the z component will be measured, a steady value should be observed.
2. Then hover the neodymium magnets vertically on top of the M input on the iO Lab device (Top Left corner). AS you lower the magnets closer to the device the graph should increase in the positive values. If not use the other face of the magnet.
3. Now mark that face with an X, to represent the magnetic field is entering that side. The opposite side should be labeled with a dot to represent that the magnetic field is exiting that side.
Rotating Motor Set-Up

1. Gather a wire lead, the magnets, a screw, and a AAA battery.
2. Set up the bottom screw on top of the magnet.
3. Place the negative side of the battery on top of the screw.
4. Place wire lead on top of positive side of battery and placed by the magnets, creating a spinning motion. Record direction: clockwise or counter clockwise.
5. Repeat by inverting orientation of battery and magnets.

Current through a wire in an external magnetic field

1. Gather two 0.5 Ohm resistors, a breadboard, 4D batteries, battery cage, tape, spool wire and the magnets.
2. Connect the battery cage to the breadboard, place one lead on the positive terminal and the other in the negative terminal across from it.
3. Place the Ohms resistors across the breadboard connecting the positive and negative terminal.
4. Lightly roll magnet on wooden table, pay attention to the way it rearranges itself in one direction. Tape down the magnets in that direction.
5. Place spool wire in front of the direction the magnet is facing. Measure around 2 feet and tape down ends but with a slight slack in it, it should be free enough to move.
6. Plug in one end of the spool wire into the positive side of the breadboard following the resistor and the other end to the negative side preceding the second resistor.
7. Observe movement of wire, repeat by inverting the manner ends of the wire were connected above.

Results

Rotating Motor

Configuration Experimental Direction Expected Direction
1 Counter clockwise Counter clockwise
2 Clockwise Clockwise
3 Counter clockwise Counter clockwise
4 Clockwise Clockwise
Figure 1. Rotating motor configuration results and predictions.

Figure 2. Configuration1 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.

Figure 3. Configuration 2 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.

Figure 4. Configuration 3 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.

Figure 5. Configuration 4 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.

Current through a wire in an external magnetic field

Configuration Experimental Direction Expected Direction
1 up up
2 down down
Figure 6. Current through a wire in an external magnetic field results and predictions.

Figure 7. Configuration 1 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.

Figure 8. Configuration 2 diagram of observation and prediction by right hand rule.
Conclusion

The direction of magnetic force experience by current traveling through a magnetic field can be accurately predicted by using the right-hand rule as validated by the experimental results. In addition, it can also be confirmed that the combination of a current field and a magnetic field create a force, which was observed in the rotation of the screw and the “jumping” motion of the wire.

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