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A text is a response to the context of a specific time or place. A clear example of this idea is demonstrated in Ridley Scott’s postmodern film noir, Bladerunner (1982). Scott explores how globalisation affects the relations between races in various countries, the nebulous distinction between humans and created beings and how the drastic improvements to science and technology result in colossal impacts to the world. During the 1970’s to 1980’s, the world began to grow as ‘advanced’ technology became routine and associations of different countries drew each other closer. The question began to arise about what it means to be human. Bladerunner acts as a warning to the future, shining a light on the disastrous world that lies ahead. (120 words)

Scott considers the significant idea of what it means to be human through the text by relating it to the postmodern world. Massive revelations have taken place in the 20th century. As science begins to uncover the truth of history’s stories, labelling them as myths, perspectives of the past are changing. Religions and traditions no longer hold importance in individuals’ lives in the text Bladerunner. The film depicts Tyrell as a conceited mastermind, who believes he can create and enslave super-humans for the sole benefit of attaining more money. “Commerce is our goal here at Tyrell.” Tyrell’s main concern is how to make a larger profit, disregarding the wellbeing of the life he creates and the potential consequences bound to arise.

The motto of Tyrell’s corporation is ‘More human than human’ is our motto’, and is first heard said by Tyrell during Deckard’s visit. However, the confrontation between Roy and his maker proves that a replicant has a greater ability to feel shame than a human being. Roy travelled from the ‘Off-world’ to Tyrell Corporation in an attempt to request a longer life, asking a similar question a human would request from their God. Tyrell rarely attended to the emotions of his super-slaves, causing some with a desperate need to survive. Scott convinces the reader that without a path of salvation, the human race will decline into a careless species, choosing to ignore guilt. (205 words)

In reference to text relating to context, Bladerunner explores the idea of the eventual impact science and technology will have on the human race and environment.

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